Representation of academics from developing countries in scientific journals: forthcoming

I’ve just heard that the paper Representation of academics from developing countries as authors and editorial board members in scientific journals: does it matter to the field of development studies?, written with Paul Hobink, has been accepted for publication in the European Journal of Development Research (EJDR), published by EADI. The paper considers a sample of 10 ‘well-known’ academic journals in the field of development studies, namely Economic Development and Cultural ChangeJournal of Development StudiesDevelopment and ChangeWorld DevelopmentThird World QuarterlyCanadian Journal of Development StudiesDevelopment Policy ReviewJournal of International Development, EJDR, and Progress in Development Studies, based on the analysis of data from the Web of Science (WoS) database for the period 2012-2014 and from journal websites. The paper demonstrates that academics from developing countries are ‘underrepresented’ as both authors and members of editorial boards in the field of development studies. Does this matter? Yes, we think it does both from the perspectives of responsibility and equity but also because development is an endogenous process. We argue that journals in the field of development studies need to make a more concerted effort to include colleagues from developing countries in their research as equal partners and co-authors. More on this when the article is published.

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This entry was posted in authors, developing countries, development, development studies, journals, publications, research. Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Representation of academics from developing countries in scientific journals: forthcoming

  1. Linda McPhee says:

    As a (long ago) former Assistant Editor of Development and Change, I’m very interested in reading your paper. It’s something I’ve thought about a lot. This was a problem the journal tried hard to address — at board/advisory levels certainly, but also in our choice of referees and in the time we spent helping first-time authors, especially less experienced authors from the Global South. I’m curious to see how much of that was visible from the outside.

    Like

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